Conservative election manifesto signals the end of new nuclear power

After years of pro-nuclear bombast from the Conservative Party, its 2017 manifesto hasn’t got a single word to say about nuclear power, write Oliver Tickell & Ian Fairlie. Instead it announces a renewed focus on cutting energy costs, and a big boost for increasingly low-cost wind power; while both Labour and Libdems offer only weak, highly qualified support for new nuclear build. And so the great British ‘nuclear renaissance’ reaches its timely end.
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Tory manifesto signals the end of new nuclear power

After years of pro-nuclear bombast from the Conservative Party, the 2017 Tory manifesto hasn’t got a single word to say about nuclear power, writes Oliver Tickell. Instead it announces a renewed focus on cutting energy costs, and a big boost for increasingly low-cost wind power; while both Labour and Libdems offer only weak, highly qualified support for new nuclear build. And so the British ‘nuclear renaissance’ reaches its timely end.
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

ConocoPhillips signals conditional support for U.N. climate deal

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Oil and gas producer ConocoPhillips on Friday said it would support a UN climate change agreement if it met its own policy principles, including creating a “level playing among energy sources and between countries.”


Reuters: Environment

Climate change signals the end of Australian shiraz as we know it

HOBART Tasmania (Reuters) – Young Australian vintner Nick Glaetzer’s winemaking-steeped family thought he was crazy when he abandoned the Barossa Valley – the hot, dry region that is home to the country’s world-famous big, brassy shiraz.


Reuters: Environment

Climate change signals a whale of a shift in feeding patterns

Every summer and fall, endangered North Atlantic right whales congregate in the Bay of Fundy between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick to gorge on zooplankton. Researchers have documented the annual feast since 1980, and well over 100 whales typically attend, a significant portion of the entire species. Only this year, they didn’t. Just a dozen right whales trickled in—a record low in the New England Aquarium’s 34-year-old monitoring program. And that comes on the heels of two other low-turnout years, 2010 and 2012.
ENN: Top Stories