Lost Ecosystem Found Buried In Mud Of Southern California Coastal Waters

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Shells from muddy sediment collected on the western Palos Verdes shelf off the coast of southern California. The shells are from the scallop Chlamys hastata. (Credit: Susan Kidwell)

(Click to enlarge) Shells from muddy sediment collected on the western Palos Verdes shelf off the coast of southern California. The shells are from the scallop Chlamys hastata.
(Credit: Susan Kidwell)

Paleontologists investigating the sea bed off the coast of southern California have discovered a lost ecosystem that for thousands of years had nurtured communities of scallops and shelled marine organisms called brachiopods.

(From Science Daily / by  Steve Koppes) — These brachiopods and scallops had thrived along a section of coast stretching approximately 250 miles from San Diego to Santa Barbara for at least 4,000 years. But they had died off by the early 20th century, replaced by the mud-dwellling burrowing clams that inhabit this seabed today. Paleontologists Adam Tomašových of the Slovak Academy of Sciences and Susan Kidwell of the University of Chicago examine the lost ecosystem in a study published online June 7 in the Royal Society Proceedings B.

Evidence indicates that the brachiopod and scallop die-off occurred in less than a century. Because this community disappeared before biologists started sampling the seafloor, its existence was unknown and unsuspected. Only dead shells remain, permitting analysis by paleontologists.

“This loss unfolded during the 19th century, thus well before urbanization and climate warming,” said Kidwell, the William Rainey Harper Professor in Geophysical Sciences. “The disappearance of these abundant filter-feeding animals coincided with the rise of lifestock and cultivation in coastal lands, which increased silt deposition on the continental shelf, far beyond the lake and nearshore settings where we would expect this stress to have an impact.”

Continental shelves, the submerged shoulders of the continents, are a worldwide phenomenon. They form a distinct environment separated by a steep slope from the much deeper and vaster expanse of ocean floor beyond, and provide key habitats for biodiversity and fisheries.

The seabed off southern California is one of the most thoroughly studied in the world, but in applying geologic methods to modern biological samples of the sea floor, Kidwell and Tomašových encountered unsuspected results. Today that seabed consists of soft sediments, where creatures such as segmented worms, crustaceans, molluscs, crabs and urchins feed on organic matter.

This is a fundamentally different ecosystem than the one that preceded it not so long ago, said Tomašových, who heads the Department of Paleoecology and Organismal Evolution at the Slovak Academy.

 

To read the full article, click here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170609091220.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fearth_climate%2Foceanography+%28Oceanography+News+–+ScienceDaily%29

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From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, CNMI Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (Jun. 7)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The CNMI Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. All times listed are local island times. For specific times and agendas, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

ADDRESSES:
The CNMI Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Saipan Department of Land and Natural Resources Conference Room, Lower Base, Saipan, MP 96950.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, CNMI Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (Jun. 7) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


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From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, Guam Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 26)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its Guam Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The Guam Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Friday, May 26, 2017, between 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times. For specific times and agendas, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

ADDRESSES:
The Guam Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Guam Fishermen’s Cooperative Association Lanai, Hagatna, Guam, 96913.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, Guam Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 26) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


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From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times.

ADDRESSES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Pacific Petroleum Conference Room, Utulei, American Samoa, 96799.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


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From The Federal Register: Public Meeting: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC) Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee (May 19)

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AGENCY:
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council’s (MAFMC) Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee will hold a public meeting.

DATES:
The meeting will be held via webinar on Friday, May 19, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

ADDRESSES:
The meeting will take place via webinar and can be accessed at: http://mafmc.adobeconnect.com/​eop_​comm_​may2017/​. To access via telephone, dial 1-800-832-0736 and use room number 5068871.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Christopher M. Moore, Ph.D., Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, telephone: (302) 526-5255.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
The MAFMC’s Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee will meet to discuss the proposed rule for the MAFMC’s Unmanaged Forage Omnibus Amendment, which published in the Federal Register on April 24, 2017 (82 FR 18882). The propose rule states that NMFS is considering disapproval of inclusion of bullet mackerel (Auxis rochei) and frigate mackerel (Auxis thazard) in the amendment. The Committee will consider if a Council response to this potential disapproval is warranted and, if so, will develop recommendations for a Council response to NMFS. Relevant background information can be found on the MAMFC Web site: www.mamfc.org.

Although other non-emergency issues not on the agenda may come before this group for discussion, in accordance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, those issues may not be the subject of formal action during this meeting. Actions of the Council will be restricted to those issues specifically identified in the agenda and any issues arising after publication of this notice that require emergency action under Section 305(c) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, provided the public has been notified of the Council’s intent to take action to address the emergency.

For more information click here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/08/2017-09218/mid-atlantic-fishery-management-council-mafmc-public-meeting

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Using Google to map our ecosystem

Researchers in the Singapore-ETH Centre’s Future Cities Laboratory developed a method to quantify ecosystem services of street trees. Using nearly 100,000 images from Google Street View, the study helps further understanding on how green spaces contribute to urban sustainability.

Do you remember the last time you escaped the hot summer sun to enjoy a cool reprieve in the shade beneath a broad-leafed tree? While sizzling summer days may seem far away right now in the northern hemisphere, tropical cities like Singapore deal with solar radiation on a daily basis.

ENN: Top Stories

Palaeoclimate: Aerosols shift lake ecosystem

Anthropogenic aerosols over the Chinese Loess Plateau have diminished monsoon precipitation and concomitant soil erosion that plagues the region. Now, a reconstruction documents the differences between historical warming events and the present, highlighting the paradoxical implications of decreasing atmospheric aerosols.

Nature Climate Change doi: 10.1038/nclimate3230


Nature Climate Change – AOP – nature.com science feeds

PRESSURE FROM GRAZERS HASTENS ECOSYSTEM COLLAPSE FROM DROUGHT

Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic.

A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why.   

The researchers found that these tipping points can happen much sooner than current models predict because of the added pressures placed on drought-weakened plants by grazing animals and fungal pathogens.

ENN: Top Stories

Scientists call for the protection of the little-known and disappearing ecosystem: seagrass ‘meadows’

A unified scientific approach has been called for to help protect one of the most threatened ecosystems on earth. LAURA BRIGGS learns more about the unique ecosystem known as seagrass beds
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Greenland Fossils Reveal Global Ecosystem Recovery After Mass Extinction

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Microconchids, like the one pictured, are ancient tube worms and paleontologists have discovered Microconchid fossils in present-day Greenland. (Credit: Mark A. Wilson/The College of Wooster)

(Click to enlarge) Microconchids, like the one pictured, are ancient tube worms. Paleontologists have discovered Microconchid fossils in present-day Greenland. (Credit: Mark A. Wilson/The College of Wooster)

A paper published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports shows how higher latitude ecosystems recovered after the World’s most cataclysmic extinction event 252 million years ago. New fossils discovered by Uppsala University palaeontologists record an empty alien world from immediately after the extinction.

(From Phys.org)– “Life on the sea floor had totally collapsed, with up 90% of all species becoming extinct,” says Dr Michal Zaton from the University of Silesia in Poland, and lead author on the international study.

“The seas were oxygen depleted and acidic, with a very low diversity bottom-living fauna comprising bivalves and vast colonies of filter-feeding microconchid tube worms. These would have encrusted shells and algal mats, which provided both suitable substrates and a potential source of oxygen,” says Dr Zaton.

Microconchid fossils have never previously been reported from ancient higher latitudes. “At the very beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs 252 million years ago, East Greenland was on the edge of a Boreal seaway stretching to the North Pole”, says Dr Benjamin Kear from the Museum of Evolution at Uppsala University and leader of the project funded by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. “Our discovery is significant because it shows for the first time that life at higher latitudes suffered the same global extinction process, and subsequent ecosystem recovery,” says Dr Kear.

Read the full article here: http://phys.org/news/2016-10-greenland-fossils-reveal-global-ecosystem.html#jCp

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