From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, Guam Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 26)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its Guam Mariana Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The Guam Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Friday, May 26, 2017, between 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times. For specific times and agendas, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

ADDRESSES:
The Guam Mariana Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Guam Fishermen’s Cooperative Association Lanai, Hagatna, Guam, 96913.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

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From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times.

ADDRESSES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Pacific Petroleum Conference Room, Utulei, American Samoa, 96799.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


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From The Federal Register: Public Meeting: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC) Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee (May 19)

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AGENCY:
National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council’s (MAFMC) Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee will hold a public meeting.

DATES:
The meeting will be held via webinar on Friday, May 19, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

ADDRESSES:
The meeting will take place via webinar and can be accessed at: http://mafmc.adobeconnect.com/​eop_​comm_​may2017/​. To access via telephone, dial 1-800-832-0736 and use room number 5068871.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Christopher M. Moore, Ph.D., Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, telephone: (302) 526-5255.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
The MAFMC’s Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee will meet to discuss the proposed rule for the MAFMC’s Unmanaged Forage Omnibus Amendment, which published in the Federal Register on April 24, 2017 (82 FR 18882). The propose rule states that NMFS is considering disapproval of inclusion of bullet mackerel (Auxis rochei) and frigate mackerel (Auxis thazard) in the amendment. The Committee will consider if a Council response to this potential disapproval is warranted and, if so, will develop recommendations for a Council response to NMFS. Relevant background information can be found on the MAMFC Web site: www.mamfc.org.

Although other non-emergency issues not on the agenda may come before this group for discussion, in accordance with the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, those issues may not be the subject of formal action during this meeting. Actions of the Council will be restricted to those issues specifically identified in the agenda and any issues arising after publication of this notice that require emergency action under Section 305(c) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, provided the public has been notified of the Council’s intent to take action to address the emergency.

For more information click here: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/08/2017-09218/mid-atlantic-fishery-management-council-mafmc-public-meeting

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Using Google to map our ecosystem

Researchers in the Singapore-ETH Centre’s Future Cities Laboratory developed a method to quantify ecosystem services of street trees. Using nearly 100,000 images from Google Street View, the study helps further understanding on how green spaces contribute to urban sustainability.

Do you remember the last time you escaped the hot summer sun to enjoy a cool reprieve in the shade beneath a broad-leafed tree? While sizzling summer days may seem far away right now in the northern hemisphere, tropical cities like Singapore deal with solar radiation on a daily basis.

ENN: Top Stories

Palaeoclimate: Aerosols shift lake ecosystem

Anthropogenic aerosols over the Chinese Loess Plateau have diminished monsoon precipitation and concomitant soil erosion that plagues the region. Now, a reconstruction documents the differences between historical warming events and the present, highlighting the paradoxical implications of decreasing atmospheric aerosols.

Nature Climate Change doi: 10.1038/nclimate3230


Nature Climate Change – AOP – nature.com science feeds

PRESSURE FROM GRAZERS HASTENS ECOSYSTEM COLLAPSE FROM DROUGHT

Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic.

A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why.   

The researchers found that these tipping points can happen much sooner than current models predict because of the added pressures placed on drought-weakened plants by grazing animals and fungal pathogens.

ENN: Top Stories

Scientists call for the protection of the little-known and disappearing ecosystem: seagrass ‘meadows’

A unified scientific approach has been called for to help protect one of the most threatened ecosystems on earth. LAURA BRIGGS learns more about the unique ecosystem known as seagrass beds
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Greenland Fossils Reveal Global Ecosystem Recovery After Mass Extinction

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Microconchids, like the one pictured, are ancient tube worms and paleontologists have discovered Microconchid fossils in present-day Greenland. (Credit: Mark A. Wilson/The College of Wooster)

(Click to enlarge) Microconchids, like the one pictured, are ancient tube worms. Paleontologists have discovered Microconchid fossils in present-day Greenland. (Credit: Mark A. Wilson/The College of Wooster)

A paper published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports shows how higher latitude ecosystems recovered after the World’s most cataclysmic extinction event 252 million years ago. New fossils discovered by Uppsala University palaeontologists record an empty alien world from immediately after the extinction.

(From Phys.org)– “Life on the sea floor had totally collapsed, with up 90% of all species becoming extinct,” says Dr Michal Zaton from the University of Silesia in Poland, and lead author on the international study.

“The seas were oxygen depleted and acidic, with a very low diversity bottom-living fauna comprising bivalves and vast colonies of filter-feeding microconchid tube worms. These would have encrusted shells and algal mats, which provided both suitable substrates and a potential source of oxygen,” says Dr Zaton.

Microconchid fossils have never previously been reported from ancient higher latitudes. “At the very beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs 252 million years ago, East Greenland was on the edge of a Boreal seaway stretching to the North Pole”, says Dr Benjamin Kear from the Museum of Evolution at Uppsala University and leader of the project funded by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. “Our discovery is significant because it shows for the first time that life at higher latitudes suffered the same global extinction process, and subsequent ecosystem recovery,” says Dr Kear.

Read the full article here: http://phys.org/news/2016-10-greenland-fossils-reveal-global-ecosystem.html#jCp

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The increasing importance of atmospheric demand for ecosystem water and carbon fluxes

During periods of hydrologic stress, vegetation productivity is limited by soil moisture supply and atmospheric water demand. This study shows that atmospheric demand has a greater effect in many biomes, with implications for climate change impacts.

Nature Climate Change doi: 10.1038/nclimate3114


Nature Climate Change – AOP – nature.com science feeds

Abundant And Diverse Ecosystem Found In Area Targeted For Deep-sea Mining

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The Clarion-Clipperton Zone in the Pacific Ocean (Credit: Sarah Mincks, SOEST)

(Click to enlarge) The Clarion-Clipperton Zone in the Pacific Ocean (Credit: Sarah Mincks, SOEST)

In a study published in Scientific Reports, scientists discovered impressive abundance and diversity among the creatures living on the seafloor in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ) — an area in the equatorial Pacific Ocean being targeted for deep-sea mining. The study, lead authored by Diva Amon, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), found that more than half of the species they collected were new to science, reiterating how little is known about life on the seafloor in this region.

(From Science Daily)– “We found that this exploration claim area harbors one of the most diverse communities of megafauna [animals over 2 cm in size] to be recorded at abyssal depths in the deep sea,” said Amon.

The deep sea is where the next frontier of mining will take place. A combination of biological, chemical and geological processes has led to the formation of high concentrations of polymetallic “manganese” nodules on the deep seafloor in the CCZ — an area nearly the size of the contiguous United States. These nodules are potentially valuable sources of copper, nickel, cobalt and manganese, among other metals, which has led to an interest in mining this region. All of the potential polymetallic-nodule exploration contracts that have been granted in the Pacific are in this region, according to the International Seabed Authority.

This study, part of the ABYSSLINE Project, was the first to characterize the abundance and diversity of seafloor-dwelling animals, a key component of deep-sea ecosystems, in an exploration claim area leased to UK Seabed Resources Ltd (UK-1) in the eastern portion of the CCZ.

Using a remotely operated vehicle, the research team surveyed the seafloor at four sites within the UK-1 exploration contract area and at a site east of the UK-1 area to estimate abundance and diversity of the ecosystems.

The preliminary data from these surveys showed that more animals live on the seafloor in areas with higher nodule abundance. Further, the majority of the megafaunal diversity also appears to be dependent on the polymetallic nodules themselves, and thus are likely to be negatively affected by mining impacts.

Read the full article here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160729092514.htm

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