Pakistan to quadruple carbon emissions despite feeling pain of climate change

As economic growth in Pakistan surges forward, and its emissions are set to soar, are the implications for climate change being forgotten, asks ANAM ZEB
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Record-Breaking Marine Heatwave Powered By Climate Change Cooks Tasmania’s Fisheries

Ocean Leadership ~

At its peak intensity, waters off Tasmania were 2.9°C above expected summertime temperatures. (Credit: Daniel Poloha / Fotolia)

(Click to enlarge) At its peak intensity, waters off Tasmania were 2.9°C above expected summertime temperatures. (Credit: Daniel Poloha / Fotolia)

Climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heatwave off Tasmania’s east coast in 2015/16 that lasted 251 days and at its greatest extent was seven times the size of Tasmania, according to a new study published today in Nature Communications.

(From Science Daily) — The marine heatwave reduced the productivity of Tasmanian salmon fisheries, led to a rise in blacklip abalone mortality, sparked an outbreak of Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome and saw new fish species move into Tasmanian waters.

At its peak intensity, waters off Tasmania were 2.9°C above expected summertime temperatures.

Lead author from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science (ARCCSS) Dr Eric Oliver said marine heatwave events of this kind were likely to increase in the future because of climate change.

“We can say with 99 per cent confidence that anthropogenic climate change made this marine heatwave several times more likely, and there’s an increasing probability of such extreme events in the future,” Dr Oliver said.

“This 2015/16 event was the longest and most intense marine heatwave on record off Tasmania.”

The research team led by scientists from ARCCSS and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania, in collaboration with the CSIRO and the Australian Institute of Marine Science, found the heatwave was driven by a surge of warm water in the East Australian Current, which has been growing stronger and reaching further south in recent decades.

The area off the east coast of Tasmania is already known as a global warming hotspot with temperatures in this region warming at nearly four times the global average rate.

Co-author Associate Professor Neil Holbrook from IMAS said it was vital to monitor and research these marine heatwaves because if identified early it would allow fisheries and aquaculture industries to adapt and manage their resources.

“The evidence shows that the frequency of extreme warming events in the ocean is increasing globally,” Associate Professor Holbrook said.

“In 2015 and 2016 around one quarter of the ocean surface area experienced a marine heatwave that was either the longest or most intense recorded since global satellite-records began in 1982.

“Studying these events plays an important role in helping industries, governments and communities to plan for and adapt to the changes and their growing impacts on our environment and ecosystems,” Associate Professor Holbrook said.

Read the full story here: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170717100443.htm

The post Record-Breaking Marine Heatwave Powered By Climate Change Cooks Tasmania’s Fisheries appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Ecologist Special Report: Animal Protection’s Surprising Role in Climate Change

On 20th May 2017, the Animal Legal Defense Fund hosted its third annual Animal Law Symposium in Los Angeles, California. It brought together legal professionals and animal advocates from all around the nation to focus on the latest answers to a very important question: How can we best protect wild animals when human activity increasingly runs counter to the interests of wildlife? One of those advocates, STEPHEN WELLS, says we can no longer afford to ignore the devastating impact of animal agriculture
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Should teenagers give up on having children to save the planet?

Science textbooks aimed at teenagers simply ignore the most effective lifestyle changes to prevent climate change: go vegetarian, cycle, take the train overseas and have fewer kids. It is time parents sat down and explained the low carbon birds and the bees, asks BRENDAN MONTAGUE
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Climate change threatens centuries’ old Indigenous cultures and traditions

Climate change will have a devastating impact on millions of people, threatening housing and agriculture. But it carries a terrible cost in terms of culture and tradition too. The young journalists and photographers working with CLIMATE TRACKER hope to capture something of these cultures before they are lost for ever
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Climate change threatens uninhabitable conditions for the Middle East and North Africa

The Ecologist is delighted to launch its collaboration with the Climate Tracker initiative today, with an article about the impact of climate change on the Middle East and North Africa region from LINA YASSIN. The Sudanese engineering student argues that climate change is already affecting the region in dire ways.
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

The Black Forest and Climate Change

As the climate change progresses, droughts are expected to become more and more common and more intense in Europe, as in many parts of the globe. However, many plants are not able to handle this kind of climate.

This includes the Norway spruce, which is Germany's most important commercial tree species and accounts for the majority of trees in the Black Forest. Valentia Vitali and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Bauhusfrom the Chair of Silviculture at the University of Freiburg are thus studying other types of needle-leaved conifers to find alternatives. Conifers play a far greater role in commercial forestry and climate protection than broad-leaved trees. In their article “Silver Fir and Douglas Fir Are More Tolerant to Extreme Droughts than Norway Spruce in South-Western Germany” published in the journal Global Change Biology, the scientists concluded that the native silver fir and the Douglas fir, which was imported from the Americas, are suitable tree replacements for the Norway spruce in the long run.

ENN: Top Stories

Why we need a global effort by corporations, citizens and nonprofits to tackle climate change

Government action isn’t enough for climate change. Private actors – including corporations, civic and advocacy groups, private citizens, and even the Catholic Church – will be crucial to successfully cutting billions of tons of carbon and tackling climate change, write two academics, MICHAEL VANDENBERGH & JONATHAN M. GILLIGAN
Environment news & analysis, climate change reports –
The Ecologist

Finding New Homes Won’t Help Emperor Penguins Cope With Climate Change

Ocean Leadership ~

The study's findings conclude that the Emperor penguin is deserving of protection under the Endangered Species Act.

(Click to enlarge) The study’s findings conclude that the Emperor penguin is deserving of protection under the Endangered Species Act.

If projections for melting Antarctic sea ice through 2100 are correct, the vanishing landscape will strip Emperor penguins of their breeding and feeding grounds and put populations at risk. But like other species that migrate to escape the wrath of climate change, can these iconic animals be spared simply by moving to new locations?

(From Science Daily) — According to new research led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), they cannot. Scientists report that dispersal may help sustain global Emperor penguin populations for a limited time, but, as sea ice conditions continue to deteriorate, the 54 colonies that exist today will face devastating declines by the end of this century. They say the Emperor penguin should be listed as an endangered species. The study was published in the June 6, 2017 edition of the journal Biological Conservation.

“We know from previous studies that sea ice is a key environmental driver of the life history of Emperor penguins, and that the fifty-percent declines we’ve seen in Pointe Géologie populations along the Antarctic coast since the 1950s coincide with warmer climate and sea ice decline,” said Stephanie Jenouvrier, WHOI biologist and lead author of the study. “But what we haven’t known is whether or not dispersal could prevent or even reverse future global populations. Based on this study, we conclude that the prospects look grim at the end of 2100, with a projected global population decline as low as 40 percent and up to 99 percent over three generations. Given this outlook, we argue that the Emperor penguin is deserving of protection under the Endangered Species Act.”

The relationship between Emperor penguins and sea ice is a fragile one: Too little sea ice reduces the availability of breeding sites and prey; too much sea ice means longer hunting trips for adults, which in turn means lower feeding rates for chicks. Only in the past few years have scientists become aware of the penguins’ ability to migrate to locations with potentially more optimal sea ice conditions.

“Before 2014, our studies of the impacts of climate change on these animals hadn’t factored in movement among populations,” said Jenouvrier. “But between then and now, a number of satellite imagery studies and genetic studies have confirmed their ability to disperse, so this was an important new variable to work into the equation.”

To determine whether migration will ultimately help Emperor penguins defend against population decline, Jenouvrier worked with mathematicians to develop a sophisticated demographic model of penguin colonies based on data collected at Pointe Géologie, one of the few places where long-term Emperor penguin studies have been conducted.

The model tracks the population connectivity between penguins as they take their chances moving to new habitats offering better sea ice conditions. “It’s like we’ve added roads between the cities the penguins live in and now get to see what happens when they travel between them,” she said.

To read the full article, click here: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607151208.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fearth_climate%2Foceanography+%28Oceanography+News+–+ScienceDaily%29

The post Finding New Homes Won’t Help Emperor Penguins Cope With Climate Change appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Merkel urges bigger fight against climate change after U.S. move

BERLIN (Reuters) – Germany and the rest of Europe should redouble their efforts to fight climate change after the withdrawal of the United States from the Paris climate pact, Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Tuesday.


Reuters: Environment