Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses

A team of researchers from four American universities says the key to reducing harmful greenhouse gases (GHG) in the short term is more likely to be found on the dinner plate than at the gas pump.

The team, headed by Loma Linda University (LLU) researcher Helen Harwatt, PhD, suggests that one simple change in American eating habits would have a large impact on the environment: if Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020.

ENN: Top Stories

From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31)

Ocean Leadership ~

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times.

ADDRESSES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Pacific Petroleum Conference Room, Utulei, American Samoa, 96799.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

What Trump’s Budget Means for the Filet-O-Fish

The president wants to cut funding for N.O.A.A., a linchpin in keeping American fishing afloat.
Oceans

Both Too Much, Too Little Weight Tied to Migraine

Both obesity and being underweight are associated with an increased risk for migraine, according to a meta-analysis published in the April 12, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The researchers looked at all available studies on body mass index (BMI) and migraine. 

ENN: Top Stories

World's First Fluorescent Frog Found in the Amazon

Scientists have discovered the world’s first known naturally fluorescent amphibian — the South American polka-dot tree frog.

ENN: Top Stories

Native American groups take oil pipeline protests to White House

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Thousands of Native American demonstrators and their supporters marched to the White House on Friday to voice outrage at President Donald Trump’s support for the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines, which they say threaten tribal lands.


Reuters: Environment

Red tape chokes off drilling on Native American reservations

FORT BERTHOLD, North Dakota (Reuters) – When the U.S. oil boom hit North Dakota a decade ago, wells sprang up quickly on the edges of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, an expanse of prairie and rolling hills three times larger than Los Angeles.


Reuters: Environment

Perfluorinated compounds found in African crocodiles, American alligators

American alligators and South African crocodiles populate waterways a third of the globe apart, and yet both have detectable levels of long-lived industrial and household compounds for nonstick coatings in their blood, according to two studies from researchers at the Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina, and its affiliated institutions, which include the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Production of some compounds in this family of environmentally persistent chemicals–associated with liver toxicity, reduced fertility and a variety of other health problems in studies of people and animals–has been phased out in the United States and many other nations. Yet all blood plasma samples drawn from 125 American alligators across 12 sites in Florida and South Carolina contained at least six of the 15 perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) that were tracked in the alligator study.

ENN: Top Stories

‘Turtle Rangers’ Planting Decoy Eggs To Track, Catch Latin American Poachers

Ocean Leadership ~

Loggerhead sea turtle next (Credit: Public Domain Image)

(Click to enlarge) Loggerhead sea turtle next (Credit: Public Domain Image)

The same tracking devices that help you find your keys and navigate with a smart phone could lead law enforcement to the profiteers in the expanding global trade of endangered sea turtle eggs.

(From KCBS)– Turtle rangers will lie in wait in the dark along Latin American beaches where poaching is common, and when mother turtles emerge from the sea, plant their decoys.

“We would find a nest that we know is vulnerable to poaching, dig into the nest and place this egg,” Sarah Otterstrom with conservation group Paso Pacifico told KCBS.

Otterstrom says a Hollywood special effects artist helped make sure the 3D printed fakes embedded with tracking devices look and feel like the real thing. “In a nest of 100 other eggs, they’re sandy and moist, they’ll be placed in a sack and they really probably will go undetected until they make it to the consumer,” Otterstrom said.

By that time, Paso Pacifico will have mapped the route of the egg and turned the information over to law enforcement. Sea turtle eggs are a delicacy in Latin America – part of traditional celebrations according to  Otterstrom. Lately however, she’s seen evidence that the eggs travel much farther than the local market. “A couple was caught smuggling sea turtle eggs in California,” she said.

Read the full article here: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2016/07/25/turtle-rangers-planting-decoy-eggs-to-track-catch-latin-american-poachers/

The post ‘Turtle Rangers’ Planting Decoy Eggs To Track, Catch Latin American Poachers appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

In hot water: Climate change is affecting North American fish

Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America — including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live, according to four new studies published today in a special issue of Fisheries magazine.

Fish that have the most documented risk include those living in arid environments and coldwater species such as sockeye salmon, lake trout, walleye, and prey fish that larger species depend on for food.

Climate change can cause suboptimal habitat for some fish; warmer water, for example, can stress coldwater fish. When stressed, fish tend to eat less and grow less. For other fish, climate change is creating more suitable habitat; smallmouth bass populations, for example, are expanding.

ENN: Top Stories