BioArt Competition, Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology (Aug. 31)

Ocean Leadership ~

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces its sixth annual BioArt competition. Help celebrate the artistic side of science by sharing a glimpse into your cutting-edge research!

Submit your most visually compelling research image or video by August 31, 2017.

About BioArt

Each day, scientific investigators produce thousands of images and videos as part of their research. However, only a few are seen outside the laboratory. Through the BioArt competition, FASEB aims to share the beauty and excitement of biological research with the public. Past winning images have been displayed at the National Institutes of Health and other venues!

Entries are welcome from individuals and research teams that either receive U.S. federal funding or include at least one member of a FASEB society. Submissions should be products of a research project. 

New Image Category

New to this competition cycle is an image category for 3D printing. Through this special focus, FASEB hopes to highlight the many different applications of this technology in biological research. Winners will be selected from this new category as well as from the contest’s long-standing image and video categories.

More Information and Resources

For more information, visit the BioArt website or email the BioArt team at BioArt@faseb.org

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Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Acidified Ocean Water Widespread Along North American West Coast

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Tidepool organisms are threatened by acidification. (Credit: Jane Lubchenco)

(Click to enlarge) Tidepool organisms are threatened by acidification. (Credit: Jane Lubchenco)

A three-year survey of the California Current System along the West Coast of the United States found persistent, highly acidified water throughout this ecologically critical nearshore habitat, with “hotspots” of pH measurements as low as any oceanic surface waters in the world.

(From Phys.org / by Mark Floyd) — The researchers say that conditions will continue to worsen because the atmospheric carbon dioxide primarily to blame for this increase in acidification has been rising substantially in recent years.

One piece of good news came out of the study, which was published this week in Scientific Reports. There are “refuges” of more moderate pH environments that could become havens for some marine organisms to escape more highly acidified waters, and which could be used as a resource for ecosystem management.

“The threat of ocean acidification is global and though it sometimes seems far away, it is happening here right now on the West Coast of the United States and those waters are already hitting our beaches,” said Francis Chan, a marine ecologist at Oregon State University and lead author on the study.

“The West Coast is very vulnerable. Ten years ago, we were focusing on the tropics with their coral reefs as the place most likely affected by ocean acidification. But the California Current System is getting hit with acidification earlier and more drastically than other locations around the world.”

A team of researchers developed a network of sensors to measure ocean acidification over a three-year period along more than 600 miles of the West Coast. The team observed near-shore pH levels that fell well below the global mean pH of 8.1 for the surface ocean, and reached as low as 7.4 at the most acidified sites, which is among the lowest recorded values ever observed in surface waters.

The lower the pH level, the higher the acidity. Previous studies have documented a global decrease of 0.11 pH units in surface ocean waters since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Like the Richter scale, the pH scale in logarithmic, so that a 0.11 pH unit decrease represents an increase in acidity of approximately 30 percent.

Highly acidified ocean water is potentially dangerous because many organisms are very sensitive to changes in pH. Chan said negative impacts already are occurring in the California Current System, where planktonic pteropods – or small swimming snails – were documented with severe shell dissolution.

“This is about more than the loss of small snails,” said Richard Feely, senior scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory. “These pteropods are an important food source for herring, salmon and black cod, among other fish. They also may be the proverbial ‘canary in the coal mine’ signifying potential risk for other species, including Dungeness crabs, oysters, mussels, and many organisms that live in tidepools or other near-shore habitats.”

Click here to read the full article: https://phys.org/news/2017-05-acidified-ocean-widespread-north-american.html

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Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses

A team of researchers from four American universities says the key to reducing harmful greenhouse gases (GHG) in the short term is more likely to be found on the dinner plate than at the gas pump.

The team, headed by Loma Linda University (LLU) researcher Helen Harwatt, PhD, suggests that one simple change in American eating habits would have a large impact on the environment: if Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020.

ENN: Top Stories

From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31)

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National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce.

SUMMARY:
The Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of its American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan (FEP) Advisory Panel (AP) to discuss and make recommendations on fishery management issues in the Western Pacific Region.

DATES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, between 4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. All times listed are local island times.

ADDRESSES:
The American Samoa Archipelago FEP AP will meet at the Pacific Petroleum Conference Room, Utulei, American Samoa, 96799.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Kitty M. Simonds, Executive Director, Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; telephone: (808) 522-8220.

For more information, click here.

The post From The Federal Register, Public Meeting: Western Pacific Fishery Management Council, American Samoa Archipelago Fishery Ecosystem Plan Advisory Panel (May 31) appeared on Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

What Trump’s Budget Means for the Filet-O-Fish

The president wants to cut funding for N.O.A.A., a linchpin in keeping American fishing afloat.
Oceans

Both Too Much, Too Little Weight Tied to Migraine

Both obesity and being underweight are associated with an increased risk for migraine, according to a meta-analysis published in the April 12, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The researchers looked at all available studies on body mass index (BMI) and migraine. 

ENN: Top Stories

World's First Fluorescent Frog Found in the Amazon

Scientists have discovered the world’s first known naturally fluorescent amphibian — the South American polka-dot tree frog.

ENN: Top Stories

Native American groups take oil pipeline protests to White House

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Thousands of Native American demonstrators and their supporters marched to the White House on Friday to voice outrage at President Donald Trump’s support for the Dakota Access and Keystone XL oil pipelines, which they say threaten tribal lands.


Reuters: Environment

Red tape chokes off drilling on Native American reservations

FORT BERTHOLD, North Dakota (Reuters) – When the U.S. oil boom hit North Dakota a decade ago, wells sprang up quickly on the edges of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, an expanse of prairie and rolling hills three times larger than Los Angeles.


Reuters: Environment

Perfluorinated compounds found in African crocodiles, American alligators

American alligators and South African crocodiles populate waterways a third of the globe apart, and yet both have detectable levels of long-lived industrial and household compounds for nonstick coatings in their blood, according to two studies from researchers at the Hollings Marine Laboratory in Charleston, South Carolina, and its affiliated institutions, which include the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Production of some compounds in this family of environmentally persistent chemicals–associated with liver toxicity, reduced fertility and a variety of other health problems in studies of people and animals–has been phased out in the United States and many other nations. Yet all blood plasma samples drawn from 125 American alligators across 12 sites in Florida and South Carolina contained at least six of the 15 perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) that were tracked in the alligator study.

ENN: Top Stories