Ocean Leadership Presence at the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting

osm2014-logo-FEATUREDThe Consortium for Ocean Leadership will be participating in the 2014 Ocean Sciences Meeting, occurring February 23-28, 2014 in Honolulu, Hawaii at the Hawaii Convention Center. 

The meeting attracts an international assembly of ocean scientists, engineers, students, educators, policy makers, and other stakeholders and is an important venue for science exchange across broad marine science disciplines.  During the meeting, Ocean Leadership is holding or contributing to a number of sessions, workshops, town hall meetings and supplemental activities.

BOOTHS:

Ocean Leadership – Booth Number 34E

Ocean Observatories Initiative – Booth Number 35E

EVENTS:

Sorted by date and time.

Title: MENTOR/MENTEE BREAKFAST

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 7:00-8:00 AM

Location: Ballroom A

Speaker: Bob Gagosian

Information: This will be an opportunity for Mentoring Program participants to spend time getting acquainted and planning activities for the week. This event, which is co-sponsored by Ocean Leadership, will be held in the Honolulu Convention Center before oral presentations begin.

Title: LEVERAGING OCEAN OBSERVATORIES AND WEB-BASED EDUCATIONAL TOOLS FOR SUSTAINED UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH IN OCEAN SCIENCE

Type: Oral

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 8:45-9:00 AM

Location: 304 AB

Session 132: Undergraduate ocean science education in the 21st century: an exploration of successful practices

Authors: Glenn, S., Schofield, O., & Kohut, J.

Information: We have implemented an ocean science research course sequence that enables undergraduate students to participate in scientific inquiry using real-time and historical ocean observatory data as early as their freshman year. The sequence clusters students in small teams lead by an upperclass mentor. Students use educational tools produced by the NSF Ocean Observing Initiative (OOI) to organize their research, explore observatory data to create new knowledge, and share their discoveries with peers and prominent guest speakers. Freshman research skills-building courses act as feeders. Barriers to participation are reduced through web-based tools that enable data exploration without requiring extensive programming skills. Research themes leverage ongoing ocean glider datastreams for regional applications in the Mid-Atlantic, the extreme environment of the Antarctic, and exploration of the global ocean. The current global focus is path-planning and model-data comparisons for a fleet of gliders circling the major ocean basins. Student participation has grown and stabilized around 70 students per semester, and include a broad range of science and non-science majors. Ocean science majors entering leading graduate schools or joining the oceanographic workforce continue to increase.

Title: POLICY IMPACTS OF OCEAN RESEARCH: COMMUNICATING SCIENCE TO DECISION-MAKERS

Type: Oral

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 2:00-4:00 PM

Location: 304 AB

Session 070

Session Organizers: Kevin Wheeler, Adrienne Sponberg

2:00 PM

CATAPULTS, FERRIES, AND BRIDGES: MOVING OCEAN SCIENCE RESULTS TO APPLICATIONS

Authors: Turner, B. & Dowgiallo, M.

2:15 PM

THE TIDE FLOWS BOTH WAYS: COMMUNICATING SCIENCE TO POLICY AND POLICY TO SCIENCE

Authors: Abeles, A., Erickson, A.L., Deans, N.L., Martone, R.G., & Kappel, C.V.

2:30 PM

THE OCEAN IN THE INTERNATION CLIMATE POLICY FORUM

Authors: Eddebbar, Y.A. & Gallo, N.

2:45 PM

THE LONDON CONVENTION, OCEAN FERTILIZATION AND LEGITIMATE SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Authors: Westley, M.B.

3:00 PM

BUILDING A BETTER MOUSETRAP (I.E. WEB MAP)

Authors: Coughlin, R.A., Barbee, M., Fletcher, C., Iwamoto, M., Schaubach, M., & Potemra, J.T.

3:15 PM

UNDERSTANDING THE USE OF SCIENCE IN WASHINGTON STATE CLIMATE LEGISLATION

Authors: Fassbender, A., Bushinsky, S.M., Maloney, A., & Newsom, E.

3:30 PM

OCEAN CARBON FEEDBACKS AND CLIMATE POLICY

Authors: Majkut, J.D., Sarmiento, J.L., & Froelicher, T.L.

3:45 PM

GETTING THE QUESTIONS RIGHT: THE ROLE OF BOUNDARY ORGANIZATIONS IN ADVANCING UNDERSTANDING OF OCEAN ACIDIFICATION AND HYPOXIA

Authors: O’Donnell, M.J., Knight, E., Meyer, R., & Boehm, A.B.

Title: THE OOI EDUCATION AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT TEAM: REAL-TIME OCEAN DATA COMING SOON TO AN UNDERGRADUATE CLASSROOM NEAR YOU

Type: Poster (#1761)

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 4:00-6:00 PM

Location: Kamehameha Hall III

Session 105: Real-Time Data, Technology, and Engineering for Ocean Science Education and Outreach

Authors: Crowley, M.F., Glenn, S.M., McDonnell, J., Lichtenwalner, C.S., & deCharon, A.

Information: The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) promises to reshape the way ocean science is conducted by providing ocean researchers with access to near real-time data, the ability to control sensors and mobile assets, and data visualization and modeling tools to conduct their research. Recent advances in web-based education, and the use of visualization technology in educational contexts, have led to the development of online platforms for instruction that engage students in active scientific inquiry by collecting and analyzing real-world data. The OOI Education and Public Engagement (EPE) team is leveraging these technologies for ocean education. EPE is constructing software tools that will enable educators to enhance their undergraduate education programs using real-time data provided by the OOI and other sources. EPE will enable a new approach to oceanography research, where scientists, students and the public can explore and research the ocean in real-time from their classrooms, dorm rooms, and homes. The face of an oceanographer will be expanded well beyond a professor at sea to a student at home viewing and analyzing exactly the same data at exactly the same time.

Title: EDUCATIONAL VISUALIZATION: SUPPORTING STUDENT KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT WITH ONLINE INTERACTIVE OCEAN DATA TOOLS

Type: Poster (#1763)

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 4:00-6:00 PM

Location: Kamehameha Hall III

Session 105: Real-Time Data, Technology, and Engineering for Ocean Science Education and Outreach

Authors: Lichtenwalner, C.S., McDonnell, J., Mills, M., Crowley, M.F., & Glenn, S.M.

Information: The stories of science are written with data. Ocean observing systems (OOS) are advancing our understanding of the natural world by amassing large quantities of data to address ever more complex processes, however, students often lack the ability to adequately analyze and synthesize these data into scientific understanding. Students learn best when provided with inquiry-driven learning opportunities, in which they can conduct their own research and develop their own questions. Unfortunately, to make meaning from oceanographic datasets, they must also be able to create and interpret graphs, which has traditionally required students to learn complex software or programming languages to do so. As part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), a suite of educational data visualization tools are being developed that allow undergraduate students to interact with data from a variety of ocean observing platforms in intuitive and engaging ways. Our design philosophy requires tools to be simple to use, interactive to support deeper understanding, customizable by educators to emphasize specific learning objectives, embeddable within the context of other learning materials, and focused primarily on the educational needs of students.

Title: DEVELOPING A RANGE OF OCEAN ADICIFICATION LEARNING TOOLS

Type: Poster (#1764)

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 4:00-6:00 PM

Location: Kamehameha Hall III

Session 105: Real-Time Data, Technology, and Engineering for Ocean Science Education and Outreach

Authors: Schofield, O.M., Richter, K., Glenn, S.M., & McDonnell, J.

Information: Ocean acidification provides an unique focus for such efforts given the inherent interdisciplinary nature of the problem. We have been developing undergraduate teaching materials that can be utilized and shared to increase understanding and applications of scientific data through blended learning tools to provide cost effective educational platforms that combines classroom training, e-learning, mentoring, and information sharing capability. We have leveraged opportunities through the NSF-funded Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence Networked Ocean World and the Ocean Observing Initiative Education and Public Engagement Program (OOI EPE). Our group is an “Early Adopter” for the OOI EPE team, allowing us to utilize and “test” the learning tools being constructed by OOI. Our tools provide 1) context with online video lecture modules for ocean acidification, 2) engage the students using the concept mapping, 3) have students explore using a series of data visualization modules, and 4) synthesize the materials through a series of guided inquiry materials. The entire system is integrated into a single online lab lesson. We have tested online OA materials in a series of educational workshops.

Title: DEVELOPING ONLINE TOOLS TO SUPPORT THE VISUALIZATION OF OCEAN DATA FOR EDUCATIONAL APPLICATIONS

Type: Poster (#1767)

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 4:00-6:00 PM

Location: Kamehameha Hall III

Session 105: Real-Time Data, Technology, and Engineering for Ocean Science Education and Outreach

Authors: Mills, M.P., Lichtenwalner, C.S., McDonnell, J., Crowley, M., & Glen, S.

Information: Data from Ocean Observing Systems can be used to provide rich opportunities for students to learn about ocean processes much as scientists do, provided students are able to interact with and visualize data in meaningful ways. As part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), we have developed an Educational Visualization (EV) framework that provides a platform for web developers to build interactive tools to support the ocean sciences community. Developers can use the framework to build new and exciting web-based tools. Educators can use these tools to generate custom interactive data visualizations, personalizing the data students use based on location or areas of interest. And students can interact with the visualization tools, at varying levels of complexity. EV is built using open-source JavaScript based libraries, including jQuery, which provides the core functionality for data requests, layout arrangement, and styling, and D3, which provides the easy-to-use foundation for the interactive visualization elements. The EV system supports the latest web standards, including HTML5, CSS3, and SVG and can easily be extended as technology continues to evolve.

Title: OPTIMIZING DATA RETURN FROM THE OOI

Type: Town Hall

Date: Monday, February 24

Time: 6:30-9:30 PM
Location: 313 B

Information: Join an open forum town hall discussion on optimizing data from the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). Discussion topics will include sensor calibration procedures, sensor cross-calibration, data management approaches, and incremental approaches for data quality as we enter the operational phase of the project. A panel of program experts will use examples of OOI data returned from initial deployments to illustrate data opportunities as well as data issues to address.

Title: CONNECTING SCIENTISTS AND EDUCATORS THROUGH SHIP-TO-SHORE SCIENCE: AN INFORMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM BRINGING THE EXCITEMENT OF SCIENCE AND ADVENTURE TO THE PUBLIC

Type: Oral

Date: Tuesday, February 25

Time: 9:15-9:30 AM

Location: 318 AB

Session 096: Ocean and Climate Change Science: Engaging Scientists in Educating the Public

Authors: Cooper, S.K., Kurtz, K., & Collins, J.

Information: Bringing every student and member of the general public on board real research vessels and inspiring them with the “wow” of technology, exploration and discovery would be the norm in an ideal world, where this experience impacts participants in significant ways. In the absence of an ideal world, however, educators and scientists must work together to inspire the public in ways that bring them as close as possible to these experiences. The education team of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) received a grant from NSF to explore the most effective ways of bringing the excitement of seafloor exploration through the JOIDES Resolution to the public – by partnering with a diverse group of scientists, educators and informal science institutions including aquaria, museums and libraries. Through the creation of a regional network and a combination of techniques, including live ship-to-shore interactions, interactive multimedia, hands-on activities, exhibit components and scientist talks, the project has gained much knowledge about the successes and challenges of different approaches, understanding audiences, and bringing knowledge of past climate change, ocean systems and exploration tools to the public.

Title: USING OCEAN OBSERVATORIES IN THE NE PACIFIC TO ADVANCE SCIENCE

Type: Town Hall

Date: Wednesday, February 26

Time: 12:45-1:45 PM
Location: 314

Information: Join a town hall discussion on how you can advance your specific scientific needs and research by utilizing data currently streaming from the Ocean Networks Canada ocean observatory and in the future when the Ocean Observatories Initiative become operational in 2015. Program experts from both organizations will provide data demonstrations and be available to take your questions during this town hall.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership