Archives for March 2014

Search for Missing Flight’s Wreckage Is Hampered by a Sea of Detritus

Marine debris experts said that objects spotted in the search area for the Malaysia Airlines jetliner could be just about anything, from mattresses to shipping containers.
NYT > Oceans

Opportunity: L’Oréal For Women in Science Program

For Women in ScienceAre you a woman in a STEM field who is committed to serving as a role model for younger generations? The L’Oréal For Women in Science program is seeking women like you to help encourage females to pursue careers in science.

The program will award five post‐doctoral women scientists in the United States this year with grants of up to $ 60,000 each.

Applicants are welcome from a variety of fields, including the life and physical/material sciences, technology (including computer science), engineering, and mathematics.

Applications are available now at https://lorealfwis.aaas.org/login/indexA.cfm and are due on Monday, May 19, 2014.

More information on the L’Oréal USA For Women in Science program can be found at www.lorealusa.com/forwomeninscience.

Should you have any questions or require additional information, please e‐mail Myriam Coneim at mconeim@us.loreal.com.


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Ground breaking battery technology promises to extend EV range

Over the last few years much of the talk with regards to the electric vehicle sector has focused upon battery restrictions with many people calling for greater investment in the sector. There was a general consensus emerging that lithium ion batteries had perhaps been pushed to their technological limit and we may need to strip back the battery sector and go back to square one. However, researchers at the University of Limerick have announced a ground breaking breakthrough which could effectively double the life of an electric vehicle battery. This new development incorporates the latest nanotechnology which is something that will impact every area of everyday life. It is a technology which has been around for a few years but is still in its infancy with regards to its potential to change areas such as battery storage capacity.
ENN: Top Stories

Revealed For The First Time: The Surprising Biodiversity Of Algae ‘Reefs’

Most people are familiar with coral reefs, but very few have ever heard of their algal equivalent — rhodolith beds. Yet, these structures provide crucial habitat for many marine species. In the first study of its kind, published in mongabay.com’s Tropical Conservation Science, researchers unveil just how important these beds are for bottom-dwelling organisms, and the species that depend on them. Superficially similar to coral, rhodoliths are made up of various kinds of photosynthetic red algae (Corallinaceae and Rhodophyta species) that form hard structures as they grow. They drift along with the currents, gradually accumulating calcium carbonate in their cells, until they get too heavy for water to move them.
ENN: Top Stories

More Ships and Planes Join Search for Jetliner

Ten planes and ten ships scoured the latest search area, roughly the size of Poland.
NYT > Oceans

DNews: Why Are There More Suicides in the Spring?

Suicide is a serious issue all over the world, and the number of victims seems to peak in the spring time. Why are suicide rates so much higher this time of year? Laci discusses this shocking trend and some theories as to why this occurs.
Discovery News

Ground breaking battery technology promises to extend EV range

Over the last few years much of the talk with regards to the electric vehicle sector has focused upon battery restrictions with many people calling for greater investment in the sector. There was a general consensus emerging that lithium ion batteries had perhaps been pushed to their technological limit and we may need to strip back the battery sector and go back to square one. However, researchers at the University of Limerick have announced a ground breaking breakthrough which could effectively double the life of an electric vehicle battery. This new development incorporates the latest nanotechnology which is something that will impact every area of everyday life. It is a technology which has been around for a few years but is still in its infancy with regards to its potential to change areas such as battery storage capacity.
ENN: Top Stories

Tasty Tech Eye Candy Of The Week (Mar 30)

This week, we present a host of tech meant to save people and perhaps save the planet.
Discovery News

Program Update: International Ocean Discovery Program – March 2014

IODP

The JOIDES Resolution will conclude Expedition 349 (South China Sea Tectonics) this month. Under the leadership of co-chief scientists Chun-Feng Li (Tongji University) and Jian Lin (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution), the expedition is investigating the opening of the South China Sea in the late Mesozoic, and its implications for Southeast Asian tectonics, climate, and deep mantle processes. On March 30, the ship will dock in Keelung, Taiwan, where approximately 300 VIPs, scientific colleagues and local students will tour the vessel. For more on Expedition 349, please see the expedition website.

The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) has begun accepting applications for two expeditions aboard the JOIDES Resolution: Expedition 355 (Arabian Sea Monsoon) and Expedition 356 (Indonesian Throughflow). 

  • Arabian Sea Monsoon (March 31–May 31, 2015) aims to understand the interaction between the Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau uplift and the development and evolution of the Indian summer monsoon.  The scientific objectives are to test whether greater Himalayan exhumation is correlated with proposed monsoon intensification after 23 Ma, determine if the monsoon strengthened or weakened at 8 Ma, constrain the timing of the Himalayas and Tibetan plateau uplift by dating the fan base and decipher the nature of the basement in the Laxmi Basin (eastern Arabian Sea) to constrain early seafloor spreading and its relation to the emplacement of the Deccan Flood Basalts.
  • Indonesian Throughflow (July 31–September 30, 2015) will drill a latitudinal transect on the Northwest Australian shelf to test several hypotheses, including whether tectonic restriction of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) was variable over the last 5 million years, whether the Australian monsoon has undergone repeated cycles of initiation and shutdown related to solar cycles in the absence of topographic effects and whether Australia’s rapid northward movement towards the Southeast Asian subduction slab graveyard induced dynamic drawdown of the Earth’s surface that progressively swept southwards across the continent. 

U.S.-affiliated scientists interested in participating in these expeditions should apply to sail through the U.S. Science Support Program of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership. The deadline to apply is May 1, 2014. For questions, please email expeditions@oceanleadership.org


Consortium for Ocean Leadership

Washington community grieves growing toll in U.S. mudslide

DARRINGTON, Washington (Reuters) – The grim task of combing through debris from a landslide that sent a wall of mud cascading over dozens of homes on the outskirts of a rural Washington town came to a standstill briefly on Saturday for a moment of silence.




Reuters: Environment